Jump to content


- - - - -

TRK / FPA?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 clum

clum

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Country:United Kingdom

Posted 18 February 2010 - 03:42 PM

Hey folks, Got a request for a bit of help with the TRK/FPA functions of the Airbus please.

Although I have a basic knowledge of what these two functions are, I could really use a bit of schooling on them.

When should they be used over the standard HDG/VS mode?
How to use them correctly to comply with ATC radar headings ect?

I was just watching the justplanes Air France A330 DVD and one of the pilots flying said during his briefing, that he preferred to fly using TRK/FPA so I assume this mode can be used all the time. Are there any benefits to doing so?

Thanks to anyone that can be bothered to write me a little tutorial on this.
Posted Image E8500@4.5Ghz, 8Gb 1066DDR2, GTX280@702/1402/1202, ASUS Rampage Extreme X48, Windows 7 Ultimate x64

#2 FreaXter

FreaXter

    Scholar

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Country:Germany

Posted 18 February 2010 - 05:07 PM

if you use TRK/FPA, the autopilot will set the heading so, that your plane flys along the selected "track" on the mcp.
if you use HDG/VS, the autopilot will will set the heading so, that your plane flys with the nose in that direction, you set on the mcp.

so if you want to fly an approach with wind, you should use TRK/FPA and set the app course (if the airport hasn't got ils euquipment). otherwise your plane will get drifted aways from the right "track".

#3 CaptainChris

CaptainChris

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 233 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany
  • Interests:A320 Airframe / Systems engineer
  • Country:Germany

Posted 19 February 2010 - 07:04 AM

TRK/FPA are mainly used your manual flying or flying non-precision approaches if these approaches are flown in selected mode.
Flying in managed mode is done with HDG/VS.
Regards, Chris

-----
PC Specification: Asus P5KC, Core2Duo E6750, 4GB RAM, Geforce 8800 GTS 640, Win-7 Pro 64bit

Posted Image

#4 clum

clum

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Country:United Kingdom

Posted 20 February 2010 - 03:34 PM

Thanks
Posted Image E8500@4.5Ghz, 8Gb 1066DDR2, GTX280@702/1402/1202, ASUS Rampage Extreme X48, Windows 7 Ultimate x64

#5 Pelusa

Pelusa

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Belgium
  • Country:Belgium

Posted 24 February 2010 - 11:13 PM

In TRK/FPA the 'bird' also shows where the aircraft is going. Also it is a very handy aid for shooting (non-precision) approaches. You can dail in a FPA of -3 degrees. Only thing you have to do is follow the 'bird'.


All for now.

EDIT: the McDonnell Douglas MD-11 also have this feature. PMDG modelled it great.
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Nederlands (Dutch) || Intel Core 2 Quad-Core Q8300 (2.5GHz,1333MHz,4MB) ||Graphics : 1024 MB nVidia GeForce GT220 || Thrustmaster Cougar Joystick with HALLSENSOR mod || Memory Dual Channel 4GB (4x1024MB) 800Mhz DDR2 || Screen Resolution 1600 x 1024 || M3 MicroTouch MT7 touchscreen overlay interface

#6 sunset

sunset

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Country:Netherlands

Posted 23 May 2010 - 10:16 AM

View PostCaptainChris, on 19 February 2010 - 07:04 AM, said:

TRK/FPA are mainly used your manual flying or flying non-precision approaches if these approaches are flown in selected mode.
Flying in managed mode is done with HDG/VS.

This is wrong. Managed mode is with the FCU windows blanked - - - - (with the exception of the altitude window) selected mode is anytime you pull something on the FCU eg. HDG or track.

TRK/FPA is used to fly a no precision approach, that is A, not in the database or B, the company is not approved to do managed / managed (specific approval is required to conduct managed / managed approaches)

It can also be used to follow a specific track, say engine out SID that is not coded into the database.

But just to clear things up HDG/VS is not a "managed mode!!!"

SS

#7 real A320 pilot

real A320 pilot

    Scholar

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Country:Thailand

Posted 24 May 2010 - 04:46 AM

View Postsunset, on 23 May 2010 - 10:16 AM, said:

View PostCaptainChris, on 19 February 2010 - 07:04 AM, said:

TRK/FPA are mainly used your manual flying or flying non-precision approaches if these approaches are flown in selected mode.
Flying in managed mode is done with HDG/VS.

This is wrong. Managed mode is with the FCU windows blanked - - - - (with the exception of the altitude window) selected mode is anytime you pull something on the FCU eg. HDG or track.

TRK/FPA is used to fly a no precision approach, that is A, not in the database or B, the company is not approved to do managed / managed (specific approval is required to conduct managed / managed approaches)

It can also be used to follow a specific track, say engine out SID that is not coded into the database.

But just to clear things up HDG/VS is not a "managed mode!!!"

SS

FPA is used for non precision , becasue it s easy.
at FAF, with gear down and 3-4 flaps down, just put the bird to -3 degree(regardless of wind), and the plane will go to the runway.

airbus don't advise to level off at MDA.
if you calculate your descent correctly  you should be able to reach MAP without level off.

#8 Hirth

Hirth

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 337 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:only Airbus ;-)
  • Country:Germany

Posted 28 May 2010 - 09:06 AM

View Postreal A320 pilot, on 24 May 2010 - 04:46 AM, said:

View Postsunset, on 23 May 2010 - 10:16 AM, said:

View PostCaptainChris, on 19 February 2010 - 07:04 AM, said:

TRK/FPA are mainly used your manual flying or flying non-precision approaches if these approaches are flown in selected mode.
Flying in managed mode is done with HDG/VS.

This is wrong. Managed mode is with the FCU windows blanked - - - - (with the exception of the altitude window) selected mode is anytime you pull something on the FCU eg. HDG or track.

TRK/FPA is used to fly a no precision approach, that is A, not in the database or B, the company is not approved to do managed / managed (specific approval is required to conduct managed / managed approaches)

It can also be used to follow a specific track, say engine out SID that is not coded into the database.

But just to clear things up HDG/VS is not a "managed mode!!!"

SS

FPA is used for non precision , becasue it s easy.
at FAF, with gear down and 3-4 flaps down, just put the bird to -3 degree(regardless of wind), and the plane will go to the runway.

airbus don't advise to level off at MDA.
if you calculate your descent correctly  you should be able to reach MAP without level off.


Hi,

could you explain how to calculate the descent correctly?
Windows 7 ultimate 64bit, Intel i7 4.2GHZ, 4GB DDR3 1600MHZ, ASUS P6T Deluxe, ATI HD4870,
Trck IR,Saitek x52 throrrle, Logitech EXTREME 3D PRO, CH pedals

#9 pina

pina

    Scholar

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lisbon
  • Interests:Become a TAP Portugal pilot
  • Country:Portugal

Posted 02 June 2010 - 07:41 PM

The 3x rule is always handy. Subtract your current altitude by the altitude you want to reach, and multiply the thousands digits by 3. That will give you the distance at which you must start descending relative to the point you want to be at X feet. For instance, you're crusing at FL390, and you want to be at 3000' at FAP. Then, you do:

39000
-3000
-----
37000

37x3=111 NM

you must start descending 111 NM from the FAP.
<img src="http://www.asa-virtual.org/tapv/signature/tapv_signature.php?callsign=TAP145" name="TAP145">

#10 Hirth

Hirth

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 337 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:only Airbus ;-)
  • Country:Germany

Posted 04 June 2010 - 12:30 PM

View Postpina, on 02 June 2010 - 07:41 PM, said:

The 3x rule is always handy. Subtract your current altitude by the altitude you want to reach, and multiply the thousands digits by 3. That will give you the distance at which you must start descending relative to the point you want to be at X feet. For instance, you're crusing at FL390, and you want to be at 3000' at FAP. Then, you do:

39000
-3000
-----
37000

37x3=111 NM

you must start descending 111 NM from the FAP.


39000  - 3000= 37000?????  :blink:
Windows 7 ultimate 64bit, Intel i7 4.2GHZ, 4GB DDR3 1600MHZ, ASUS P6T Deluxe, ATI HD4870,
Trck IR,Saitek x52 throrrle, Logitech EXTREME 3D PRO, CH pedals

#11 Woeitinque

Woeitinque

    Established Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Country:Netherlands

Posted 22 November 2011 - 03:23 PM

View PostHirth, on 04 June 2010 - 12:30 PM, said:

View Postpina, on 02 June 2010 - 07:41 PM, said:

The 3x rule is always handy. Subtract your current altitude by the altitude you want to reach, and multiply the thousands digits by 3. That will give you the distance at which you must start descending relative to the point you want to be at X feet. For instance, you're crusing at FL390, and you want to be at 3000' at FAP. Then, you do:

39000
-3000
-----
37000

37x3=111 NM

you must start descending 111 NM from the FAP.


39000  - 3000= 37000?????  :blink:

:)
It's track miles times 3 and altitude to sink divided by 3. So, 39000-3000=36000 --> 360/3 = 120 NM or on approach you hear 35 track miles to go = you should be more or less at FL100

#12 Flightplayer

Flightplayer

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Country:Portugal

Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:54 PM

View Postpina, on 02 June 2010 - 07:41 PM, said:

The 3x rule is always handy. Subtract your current altitude by the altitude you want to reach, and multiply the thousands digits by 3. That will give you the distance at which you must start descending relative to the point you want to be at X feet. For instance, you're crusing at FL390, and you want to be at 3000' at FAP. Then, you do:

39000
-3000
-----
37000

37x3=111 NM

you must start descending 111 NM from the FAP.

But how do I know what will my Vertical Speed be?

#13 FLEX1978

FLEX1978

    Guru

  • Customer Support
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2001 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:United Kingdom

Posted 06 November 2012 - 10:32 PM

Ground speed (in knots) multiply  by 5.  So, 500 knots for example -  500 knots times 5 = 2500FPM

Or. I just select OP DES, THR IDLE and switch to V/S later, or FPA 3 degrees.
Rob Prest

Posted Image